Auburn Veterinary Annual Conference, J.T. Vaughan Equine Conference set for Oct. 18-21

Published: October 16, 2018
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Auburn University’s College of Veterinary Medicine will hold its most popular continuing education programming and fellowship—the 111th Annual Conference and the 13th Annual J.T. Vaughan Equine Conference—Oct. 18-21.

Nearly 600 veterinary medical professionals will attend the Annual Conference, “Healthy Practices/Healthy Patients: Techniques and Tools that Add Value to Your Practice,” at The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center.

Previously held each spring, the move to fall allows the conference to be held in conjunction with the J.T. Vaughan Equine Conference so veterinarians from all specialty areas—equine, large animal and small animal as well as veterinary technicians—can participate. Attendees can earn up to 20 hours of continuing education credit.

Education isn’t the only activity at the Annual Conference: The college will bestow its highest alumni awards, the Wilford S. Bailey Awards, as well as recognize other alumni. Alumni reunions for 10 classes will be held for the classes of 1968, 1973, 1978, 1983, 1988, 1993, 1998, 2003, 2008 and 2013. Several social events are planned as well.

A noteworthy slate of internationally respected experts, including more than 40 Auburn veterinary faculty, are speakers and presenters.

The keynote speaker is Wendy S. Myers, a certified veterinary journalist whose consulting firm, Communication Solutions for Veteri¬narians Inc. in Denver, Colorado, helps veterinary teams and owners improve communication skills, compliance, client service and hospital management.

Featured speakers include:

  • Equine Conference: Steve Adair, associate professor of equine surgery at the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. He is a burn injury specialist and an expert in equine rehabilitation modalities. Adair founded and is director of the Equine Performance Medicine and Rehabilitation Center, the only university-based course in equine rehabilitation in the United States.

  • Small Animal: Michael Willard, senior professor and professor emeritus of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at Texas A&M University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. He specializes in gastroenterology, hepatology, pancreatology and endoscopy (flexible and rigid).

  • Farm Animal: Bob Larson, the Edgar E. and M. Elizabeth Coleman Chair of Food Animal Production Medicine at Kansas State University, and executive director of KSU’s Veterinary Medical Continuing Education. Larson’s research focuses on investigating ways to improve beef cattle health, production and reproduction. His primary area of interest is the integration of animal health, production efficiency and economic considerations in beef cattle production.

The College of Veterinary Medicine is the South's original and nation's seventh oldest veterinary medical program, celebrating 126 years. We prepare individuals for careers of excellence in veterinary medicine, including private and public practice, industrial medicine, academics, and research. The college provides programs of instruction, research, outreach, and service that are in the best interests of the citizens of the state of Alabama, the region, the nation, and the world.